The Tooth Nemesis: Sugar

The Tooth Nemesis: Sugar

Perhaps everybody has gone through a stage in their childhood when they would constantly hear their elders warning them about the evils of eating too much sugary sweets and candies. And those warnings are true indeed; eating sugary sweets and candies is a major cause of tooth decay.

However, it might be helpful for you to know that its not just about the amount of sugar that you eat – it also involves when and how you eat sugary stuffs that determine the health of your teeth.

When you drink sodas or eat sugary foods throughout the day, the enamel of your teeth becomes constantly exposed to acids. Cough drops, hard candies, and breath mints are just some examples of the harmful sugary sweets that dissolve in your mouth slowly.

Dental professionals and experts suggest a 3-hour break in between taking food and drinks that contain sugar. Starchy or sugary foods eaten with a full meal is said to be less harmful to the teeth compared to being eaten alone because the increased production of saliva helps wash away the bacteria and sugar.

Eating sweet and sugary foods before sleeping is perhaps the most damaging thing one can do to his or her teeth because one does not produce a lot of saliva when he or she is asleep.

If you want to have a healthy set of teeth yet you cant seem to cut out sweets from your diet, you can try some of these tips to help you achieve your goal: eat carbohydrates with a meal, brush your teeth directly after eating, rinse your mouth thoroughly with mouthwash or water, chew sugarless gum, don’t eat sugary foods and sweets between meals, eat non-sugary foods (cheese, popcorn, yogurt, raw veggies) as snacks.

In a nutshell, achieving and maintaining a healthy set of teeth may not be as easy as 123 but with enough determination and commitment to your personal dental care routine, you will surely have the smile that you’ve always wanted.

For any questions regarding this article or to schedule your appointment, please contact our office at (516) 869-9787 or visit us at www.macabidental.com

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