Pulling Your Own Teeth

Pulling Your Own Teeth

Even though it may sound very odd and downright compelling, a lot of people actually try to extract their own teeth.  Toothache pain can be very painful and very frustrating, making you try anything to get relief.  Depending on how bad the pain is, you’ll be more than willing to do just about anything you can to get the pain to stop.  Abscesses or really bad cavities are among the worst, as the pain never seems to let up – no matter what you do.

In the old days, teeth were extracted by pliers, as there were no dentists around.  During these times, people would get drunk on alcohol and then the teeth would be extracted.  There was no such thing as anaesthesia back then, so it was impossible to locally numb the pain.  These days though, local anaesthesia is the best way to numb a toothache before pulling the tooth.  If you attempt to pull a tooth yourself, you’ll feel the pain no matter what you do.

Even though a tooth may feel loose when you touch it, doesn’t always mean that you can grab a pair of pliers and rip it out.  Teeth are very delicate.  If you try to rip a tooth out with pair of pliers and make even a small mistake, you could end up doing more harm than good.  Putting pliers in your mouth can also lead to an infection, which would send you to the dentist.  Abscesses, especially should never be dealt with on your own – you’ll need to go to a dentist to have him properly extract the tooth and give you some antibiotics to stop the infection.

To be on the safe side and avoid any potential problems that could easily arise, you should always go to the dentist if you have a toothache.  No matter how bad the pain may be, you should never attempt to pull the tooth yourself. Your dentist can numb the area before he pulls the tooth, so you’ll feel no pain at all.  He will also prescribe you some pain medicine and antibiotics as well, to help treat any infection you may have.  If you attempt to pull the tooth yourself, you’ll only cause more problems in the end – and end up going to a dentist anyway.

 

For any questions regarding this article or to schedule your appointment, please contact our office at (516) 869-9787 or visit us at www.macabidental.com

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